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Marnyhac

Bronze-caster
(Active from 2nd part of 19th century)
attributed to

“African Venus”

France
Circa 1878

Height : 168 cm (66 in.) ; Width : 54 x 45 cm (21 1/4 x 17 3/4 in.)

“La Vénus Africaine” Cordier bronze sculpture Tobogan Antiques Paris antiquités XIXe siècle“La Vénus Africaine” Cordier bronze sculpture Tobogan Antiques Paris antiquités XIXe siècleA similar model mounted as a floor lamp was exposed by Charles de Marnyhac at the Paris Universal Exhibition of 1878.
(Reproduced in “L’Art et L’Industrie de tous les peuples à l’Exposition Universelle de 1878”, Librairie Illustrée, Paris)
A similar work is now presented at the Shangri-La hotel, in Paris, on Iena avenue.

An exceptional life-size two patina bronze figure, representing a young African woman taming a snake, dressed with a feathered loincloth and a long drape in her hair, and wearing African jewels.

Biography

Marnyhac et Cie was used as the commercial name for the Société des Marbres et Bronzes Artistiques de Paris (the Paris Marbles and Artistic Bronzes Society) which was established since the middle of 19th century in Paris, on the Opera avenue and then at N.1, rue de la Paix. Managed by Charles de Marnyhac, the bronze-foundry company specialized production of luxurious pieces as well as casts from models made by the greatest sculptors of the time, such as Jean-Baptiste Clésinger (1814-1883), Amédée Charron (1847-1937) and Eugène Despléchin (1852-1926). The Marnyhac firm was awarded a medal at the 1878 Universal Exhibition, and showed again their works at the Paris Universal Exhibition of 1900. The company closed down around 1910.

Bibliography

Great Exhibitions 1851-1900, Jonathan Meyer, Antique Collector’s Club, 2006, p°241.

L’Art et L’Industrie de tous les peuples à l’Exposition Universelle de 1878, Librairie Illustrée, Paris.

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