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Ref. 1177/1

« Mazarin » chandelier

France
Circa 1860

Gilded bronze

Height : 75 cm (29,5 in.) ; Diameter : 73 cm (28,7 in.)

Rare chiseled and gilded bronze chandelier with six square section light-arms adorned with acanthus leaves et ending with delicately crafted binet and bobeches. The central baluster-shaped barrel richly decorated with foliage is framed by three square section mounts.

This « Mazarin » chandelier evokes the creations of André-Charles Boulle (1642-1732), famous French cabinet-maker, bronze-caster, gilder and drawer who was the first to apply gilded bronze to cabinet-making thanks to his privilege. Working for the King and the royal family, his creations have been a source of inspiration for artists throughout the centuries and had a renewed interest in the 19th century, as the beautiful chandelier proves.

Eight light-arms chandelier in gilded bronze, around 1700-1710, attributed to André-Charles Boulle and kept in the Louvre Museum (OA 10601)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Model of chandelier composed by André-Charles Boulle, reproduced in Histoire du luminaire, Henry René d’Allemagne, Alphonse Picard, 1891, planche 30

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sconces, chandeliers, candlesticks and other candelabra, which illuminate the rooms, grow considerably during the seventeenth century. Although already existing in the 17th century, the word “chandelier” was only used late because until the 18th century in the old inventories, the chandelier is designated by the word “candlestick”. Their refinement attests to the social status of their owner.

Their sophisticated decor marked by great rigor and classical solemnity are inspired by decorative drawings made by Jean Bérain, Daniel Marot, Le Pautre or André-Charles Boulle and widely adopted by other artisans through all Europe. At the end of the seventeenth century and during the early eighteenth century, interior designers introduced for their models used in decorative arts a new vibrancy, freed from Le Brun’s Classicism, and paving the way to the Regency style, then more intimate.

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